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Old 05-14-2014, 11:59 AM View Post #1 (Link) Final Piece #1
Lydia (Offline)
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Here's one of my art final pieces, if anybody has any suggestions for how it could be improved, please go ahead .
I used acrylic paints and most of it was with a kind of stippled effect. It's also in A2, but sorry the image is small .

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Old 05-14-2014, 08:44 PM View Post #2 (Link) Fine job
AutostradaUnchained (Offline)
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Quite frankly, I did not expect much from this- many people post their art online, but this one was the first one that looked to be a professional-level quality.
First of all, your choice of colors charmed me. I love the shade of blue, especially with the expression of the face. I don't know how often you make these, but a lighter, more royal blue color to make the expression clearer would also be nice, (I had to look closely to see the mouth.) Shiny colors are crucial for textures like this though, so whatever colors you use, don't use bland ones.
Keep up the talent!!
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Old 05-17-2014, 03:36 AM View Post #3 (Link)
Isis (Offline)
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I really like the choice of paint handling (the stippling) and color palette for this painting. I think both contribute to the texture, the feeling that this is stone. The blue feels kind of realistic (I assume you're working from a reference), but it feels more like the mood of the Buddha to me, or a reflection of morning or evening light, than a really literal description of what the statue looks like.

For the most part I think that this use of both color and texture is able to sit on and model the form of the statue well. I really like the clearly defined plane of the side of the head, like behind the eyes/cheekbone. I think that makes it feel like a carving to me. And I felt like the eyes, brows, and outlines of the face were well defined. I do find the black line that delineates the nose/brow to be a bit odd - is it that black, that defined on the statue? Is it painted on? Or is there a groove carved there? I can't really tell whether it's a surface thing or a volume thing (ie, if it's a black line or a dark deep shadow), and that bugs me. I'm not sure how to make that more clear, except to maybe use a bigger range of grays in that line if it's painted (to reflect how it lays on top of the form of the face).

There were other parts of the painting that also didn't feel as well defined or carefully modeled to me, but which I think should be editable if you decide to work on this painting more. The spheres that make up the hair/head work in some places, like above the ear and the light cheek plane closest to the viewer. But a lot of the rest of it, particularly near the top and corners of the canvas, feels kind of flat to me, like those spheres weren't rendered as carefully. I also think there could be something funky going on with the shoulder and the bottom of the ear closest to the viewer; I feel like that isn't as clear as the rest of the painting.

Originally Posted by AutostradaUnchained View Post
Shiny colors are crucial for textures like this though, so whatever colors you use, don't use bland ones.

I might take the advice above with a grain of salt; I thought this texture was "hewn stone", basically. A lot of textures do depend on a bright accent color or a white slick to show that they are shiny or wet, but I didn't see this as shiny or wet; rather, I saw it as a little bit rough. Like stone that has been carved but not polished smooth, so that it retains its original texture on much of the surface. I think there's lots of room for using both subtle and bright colors when painting stone, and I wouldn't leave out the grays or the more muted or dull colors if they are needed to get the color tone of the painting right, to create shadows, to create form, etc.
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Old 06-19-2014, 07:45 PM View Post #4 (Link) This post is a reply - don't critique it
Lydia (Offline)
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Originally Posted by Isis View Post
I really like the choice of paint handling (the stippling) and color palette for this painting. I think both contribute to the texture, the feeling that this is stone. The blue feels kind of realistic (I assume you're working from a reference), but it feels more like the mood of the Buddha to me, or a reflection of morning or evening light, than a really literal description of what the statue looks like.

For the most part I think that this use of both color and texture is able to sit on and model the form of the statue well. I really like the clearly defined plane of the side of the head, like behind the eyes/cheekbone. I think that makes it feel like a carving to me. And I felt like the eyes, brows, and outlines of the face were well defined. I do find the black line that delineates the nose/brow to be a bit odd - is it that black, that defined on the statue? Is it painted on? Or is there a groove carved there? I can't really tell whether it's a surface thing or a volume thing (ie, if it's a black line or a dark deep shadow), and that bugs me. I'm not sure how to make that more clear, except to maybe use a bigger range of grays in that line if it's painted (to reflect how it lays on top of the form of the face).

There were other parts of the painting that also didn't feel as well defined or carefully modeled to me, but which I think should be editable if you decide to work on this painting more. The spheres that make up the hair/head work in some places, like above the ear and the light cheek plane closest to the viewer. But a lot of the rest of it, particularly near the top and corners of the canvas, feels kind of flat to me, like those spheres weren't rendered as carefully. I also think there could be something funky going on with the shoulder and the bottom of the ear closest to the viewer; I feel like that isn't as clear as the rest of the painting.




I might take the advice above with a grain of salt; I thought this texture was "hewn stone", basically. A lot of textures do depend on a bright accent color or a white slick to show that they are shiny or wet, but I didn't see this as shiny or wet; rather, I saw it as a little bit rough. Like stone that has been carved but not polished smooth, so that it retains its original texture on much of the surface. I think there's lots of room for using both subtle and bright colors when painting stone, and I wouldn't leave out the grays or the more muted or dull colors if they are needed to get the color tone of the painting right, to create shadows, to create form, etc.
I'm sorry about the really late reply, I've been really caught up in a lot of things and thankyou very much for the crit! I do see what you mean now about the nose effect, I think I should have tried to have made the shape of it more three dimensional so that you could see the direction of it. And yes, I also agree that some parts of it, especially the head part of the subject could be more defined. Unfortunately, I have submitted the piece now but when I get it back I hope to work on these pieces more, I think I'm averaging out at a C .

Thankyou for all of the crits!
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